JohnB's Games

Role-Playing, my way.

User Tools

Site Tools


pathfinder:off-the-shelf:ships_boats:ships_and_boats2

Ships and Boats

I have tried a few ways of doing this so far - this format is a work in process …

Basic Boats

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Raft. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. You do not need any specialized boat building facilities to build any of these vessels. However, you will need appropriate craft or survival skills. These are the favoured vessels of many small wetland and river communities.

Vessel Notes
Rafts are quick to build, and often used by river and swamp folk as a simple work platform. It also serves adventures as an emergency vessel - and can be constructed using Survival or any (appropriate) Craft Skill.
Dugout Canoes take a long time to build, and are a major time investment, but they aren't all that difficult to build if you have woodworking or shipbuilding skills. Add a simple outrigger, and they become very stable vessels that are easy to paddle.
Coracles are very light boats made from a basket-work frame covered with treated animal skins. They aren't very stable and need regular maintenance, but they are very light and can be carried (easily) between waterways, ponds and swampy areas. Most are only large enough for one person, although the very largest can take four.

Click here for the Raft Technical Description


Small Boats

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Rowing Boat. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. You do not need any specialized boat building facilities to build any of these vessels. However, you will need appropriate craft or survival skills. You find these vessels wherever there are harbours, jetties or even just beaches, and they are probably the most common waterborne vessels in the world. While they are called Rowboats, some are fitted with sails as well. Small boats cost 50gp, unless otherwise noted.

Vessel Notes
Rowboats are small boats, propelled by up to four oars. They are used to ferry people and small amounts of cargo, or used as a local fishing boat. Larger ships use rowboats as tenders or lifeboats.
Punts are light, flat-bottomed boats, that are particularly effective on very shallow and slow running water - such as marshes, swamps, shallow rivers or creeks. They are normally poled, but can also be paddled if required.
Dinghies are rowboats that have been fitted with a sail, that are often used for training, pleasure or slightly longer journeys. Dinghies cost 60gp (10gp more than a normal rowboat) - you cannot use the oars and sail at the same time.

Click here for the Rowboat Technical Description


Large Boats

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Ship's Boat. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. Large open boats used for transporting people and cargo across short distances. They can all cope with short trips into ocean waters, but are generally used coastal or inland waters. They are not, normally, used for long trips as there is no cabin space, but all can survive at sea, for quite a while, if they are required to. Large boats cost 500gp, unless otherwise noted.

Vessel Notes
Ship's Boats can propel by up to ten oars and are generally used to transport crew and passengers from ship to shore. Larger ships use longboats as tenders and lifeboats. Large vessels may be known as Cutters, with smaller vessels are known as a Jolly Boat.
A Dory is a high sided fishing boat that is used for lake, estuary and coastal fishing. They rarely sail a long way out to sea.
Whalers are double-ended with space at both ends for the harpooner to cast securely. They are fitted with special crossbeams that allow the whale to 'tow' the boat, without pulling it to pieces.
A Riverboat is the exception to all the rules, as it is much larger than the other boats at 30 ft by 15. It carries five times the cargo (10 tons) and costs three times as much (1500gp), but only uses the same number of crew. However, it is not designed for open water, and would founder at sea.

Click here for the Ship's Boat Technical Description


Keelboats

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Keelboat. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. Keelboats are the vessels of small scale merchants or successful fishermen, and all have specific adaptions that make them suitable for a particular role. They are much less effective when they are used for other roles. All keelboats are about 60 feet long and 15-20 feet wide. Keelboats cost 3000gp, unless otherwise noted.

Vessel Notes
Keelers are the archetypical river trading boat, with a large open cargo deck and a very small cabin. They are not well suited to even coastal waters, let alone the open ocean.
Knarrs are long open boats with a shallow draft, suitable for river or ocean travel. However, they don't have a cabin or an enclosed cargo hold, and are mainly found in coastal waters, or on wide rivers and estuaries.
Hoys are large barge-like sailing boats, that are too heavy to be rowed, and are most used as merchant vessels along coastal waters they are heavy and cannot be rowed. They can cope with shallow seas, but aren't well suited to Ocean Voyages, although they can sail along wide, deep rivers. A Hoy has cabins for passengers and crew, 1 mast, 40 sq of sails, the sail has 160hp, Max Speed: 60 (wind). It is suitable for long journeys and can carry 60 tons of cargo, and needs a crew of 10.
Hookers are open water fishing boats, that relies (primarily) on sails. It can be rowed slowly (speed 10) by four large sweeps, but not while they are under sail. They have very limited cabin space and deal best with coastal waters and shallow seas, however, they take short trips into deeper waters safely. A Hooker has a single small cabin, 1 mast, 40 sq of sails, the sail has 150hp, Max Speed: 60 (wind). It can carry 40 tons of cargo, needs a crew of 10 and not suitable for long journey.

Click here for the Keelboat Technical Description


Coasters

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Coaster. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. Coasters are all, roughly, 70×20 feet and designed for shallow sea work. Most work as local traders, although some are used as fishing vessels. They are not particularly good for long voyages, and can only sail on the widest and deepest rivers. They are among the slowest of the seagoing vessels and cost 7000 gp, unless otherwise noted.

Vessel Notes
Cogs are sometimes known as round ships, and are most commonly used as basic merchant vessels. They are capable of longer ocean voayages, but they aren't comfortable to travel in.
Sambuks are cousins to the Xebec, Boom and Dhow and work as shallow water merchant or fishing vessels.
Luggers are fishing ships capable of long fishing runs, however, they also make good trade vessels.

Click here for the Coaster Technical Description


Longships

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Longship. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. Longships are narrow, compared to other ships - and of simple construction. These open vessels are powered by oars and sail, and do not have cabins for the crew or spacious cargo holds. They are used by navies, pirates and raiders, they cost 10,000 gp, unless otherwise noted.

Vessel Notes
Snekkja are the classic Viking raiding ship. They are capable of long ocean voyages, but they aren't comfortable to travel in.
Light Galleys are used by navies to patrol inshore waters and may be fitted ballistae, as well as a ram - but they make excellent raiders as well.
Karvi are pure raiding vessels, that are used widely by Fjord Orc marauders - you won't find them for sale in 'civilized' shipyards, and most Fjord Orc tribes only have one (or two at most). They come fitted with a ram and small fore and stern castles, however they are not, generally, fitted with siege weapons. Because of the way the castles are fitted, a Karvi can only carry one large siege engine in each castle. You cannot buy one of these vessels.

Click here for the Longship Technical Description


Sailing Ships

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Sailing Ships. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. Built with a deep hull, sailing ships are designed for open water, and are favoured by many pirates, navies and merchants. However, they may run aground in shallow seas, and will only be found in the deepest river mouths. They cost 10,000 gp, unless otherwise noted.

Vessel Notes
Sailing ships are differentiated by their mast placement, cabin placement, and the way the sails are rigged. Examples of Sailing Ship types include the: Brigantine, Brig, Barque, Caravel, Carrack, Cutter, Schooner, Sloop and many other names. However, they can be configured for different functions, for example: Whalers have fewer warriors, but have specialist equipment for hunting whales. Merchants maximise their cargo space, and travel from port to port. Navies use sailing ships for patrols, as messengers, scouts or raiders.

Rather than descriptions, I have included a few images different types of Ship Types.

Carrack

Caravel

Schooner

Barque

Brigantine

Brig

Sloop

Click here for the Sailing Ship Technical Description

Man-o-War - a Man-o-War is a large sailing ship, similar to those described above, which are commonly employed by Navies who want to conduct battles outside their own coastal waters. They normally built with four masts, and all the upgrades that can be built into a new ship. Then they are fitted with more upgrades, batteries of siege engines and a detachment of marines. Some Men-o-War carry over 100 marines. Frigates, Galleons and Xebecs are normally built as Men-o-War and are significantly more expensive than normal sailing ships.


Junks

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Junk. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. Vessels in this class have a shallow draught, stacked stern and a single cargo deck. True junks need fewer crew becasus eiof their sail design, although others need larger crews to handle more complex sails.. They cost 15,000 gp, unless otherwise noted.

Vessel Notes
Junk are the classic eastern sailing ships. They are capable of long ocean voyages, but they can be uncomfortable in deep waters and strong winds. While they only have one cargo deck, but are often built with stacked cabins at the stern.
A Bagla is a medium-sized deep-sea dhow, a traditional Arabic sailing vessel. This type of dhow has two or three masts, with lateen sails and built up stern quarters. Like the junk, it has a single cargo deck, with a 'cabin deck' at the stern, although it if not generally built as high as a junk. It needs a minimum crew of 15 to handle the sails.

Click here for the Junk Technical Description


Warships

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Warship. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. Warships are large vessels, equipped with both oars and a sail, that carry a large crew, many siege weapons and up to 100 marines. They do not travel well across open seas and are generally deployed in shallow waters, as part of a local navy. They cost 25,000 gp, unless otherwise noted.

That only real difference between different types of Warship are the cabin and sail arrangements, so I have added a few images to give you an idea of styles.

Click here for the Warship Technical Description


Galleys

These vessels all conform to the technical description of a Galley. Minor, descriptive, items might change slightly, but the numbers don't. Galleys are colossal vessels, equipped with both oars and a sail, that carry a large crew, up to 200 marines, many siege weapons, and are among the fastest vessels on the seas. They do not travel well across open seas and are generally deployed in shallow waters, as part of a local navy. Bigger than Warships, they cost 30,000 gp, unless otherwise noted.

That only real difference between different types of galley are the cabin, sail and oar arrangements, so I have added a few images to give you an idea of styles.

Click here for the Galley Technical Description


pathfinder/off-the-shelf/ships_boats/ships_and_boats2.txt · Last modified: 2022/10/21 09:39 by johnb